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Peak Turkey Gobbling Activity, Turkey Breeding Season Phases

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Peak Gobbling Dates Chart

 

 

  

 

Peak Turkey Gobbling Activity

The time when tom turkeys may be most likely to respond to calls is during one of the spring breeding season's gobbling peaks. For years most turkey biologists and researchers talked about only two gobbling peaks, one before the primary breeding phase, and one after the primary breeding phase. And many hunters try to hunt during those two gobbling peaks.

Below is a graph of gobbling activity from my 1998 study. It shows that there were two gobbling peaks, and they occurred when the MN State turkey biologist said they would; during the first to second week of April, and the first week of May.

However, during the next three years of my turkey research project I discovered that (at least in my area) there may regularly be four gobbling peaks. As far as I know I am the first person to document and talk about these multiple gobbling peaks.

You can see by the graph below that between 1998 and 2001, peak gobbling did not always occur during the same weeks; and that there were only two gobbling peaks in 1998 (because I did not conduct gobbling counts before April nor after mid-May). There were four gobbling peaks in 1999, six peaks in 2000, and three peaks in 2001. Although there are six peaks in 2000, cold temperature and rain reduced gobbling during the first April gobbling peak, and during the first May gobbling peak. This resulted in those two gobbling peaks being divided into two peaks each. I suspect that, if it hadn't been cold and rainy, the April peaks may have been combined into one peak, and the May peaks may have combined into another peak. However, this shows that severe weather can reduce gobbling, and may result in more gobbling peaks than normal.

 

Turkey Breeding Season Phases

As a result of my studies I divided the turkey breeding-season into several different phases, much like the phases of the rut of white-tailed deer. These phases were first published in the National Wild Turkey Federation's Turkey Call magazine in 2001. To view more information about turkeys, turkey behavior, turkey management and turkey hunting read my turkey articles in Trinity Mountain Outdoor News and T.R.'s Tips; Turkey Hunting.

The turkey breeding season phases are:

Phase 1: Flock Re-integration Phase Gobbling Peak

Turkeys often spend the winter in hen groups, tom groups and jake groups. However, in some areas, especially when food sources are low turkeys may stay together in large mixed flocks. As the days become warmer the jakes and toms may leave the hens. Then, as the urge to mate comes over the turkeys the jakes may join the toms to form groups as they search for hens. In areas where food sources are limited the toms and jakes may travel with the hens throughout the day, and roost with them at night. As a result of the toms being in contact with the hens, there may be an early gobbling peak that is not often talked about. Gobbling at this time is usually performed by adult males, and as the days grow longer more males begin to gobble. In the south gobbling may begin in early February, in the north it may begin as early as the first week of March.

Phase 2: Post Flock Re-integration Phase Gobbling Lull

During the three years of my research I found that gobbling activity usually decreased within a week of the toms and hens getting together. Although this lack of gobbling may be a result of the toms being near the hens, and thus not needing to gobble, I suspect that low temperatures and wet conditions contributed to decreased gobbling. This is when birds in some areas begin to leave their wintering areas, and when large tom flocks may break up into smaller groups, which results in less gobbling activity.

Phase 3: Pre-Primary Breeding Phase Gobbling Peak

As the days become longer the toms start to gobble more. Although the hens may not be ready to breed at this time (because they are either not ready, or it is too cold and wet) the toms are, and they increase their gobbling in an effort to attract the hens. This results in an increase in gobbling prior to the Primary Breeding Phase. If the hens are still in large flocks they may begin to breakup and migrate at this time. The hen groups may be followed by the toms as they migrate or the toms may follow the hens days later. Because the toms are ready to breed and are still establishing dominance, they may respond to the sound of a hen to try to initiate breeding, or to the sound of a gobbler to exert dominance. This phase may last a week or more, until many of the hens are ready to breed.

Phase 4: Primary Breeding Phase Gobbling Lull

As the days continue to grow longer, and the weather warms, the hens become interested in breeding and spend more time at feeding areas and strutting sites, where the toms often hang out. To attract the hens when they are within visual range the toms gobble less, and begin to display by strutting, showing their colorful head, and by spitting and drumming. Because the toms are displaying instead of calling to attract hens there is a decrease in gobbling during this phase. This is when the toms are least likely to respond to a call. This phase may last from a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the number and sex ratio of birds in the area, and the weather.

Phase 5: Post Primary Breeding Phase Gobbling Peak

After the hens have been bred they begin building nests and laying. However, they don't spend much time on the nest until after their last egg has been laid. Since hens may lay up to 12 eggs, they may not begin nesting until 1-2 weeks after they have been bred. While they are laying and nesting the hens usually travel by themselves, but they may join other hens at preferred feeding/strutting sites, where there may be toms. Gobbling activity usually reaches it's highest level while the hens nest and the toms try to attract any hens that are still willing to breed. This is when the toms may be the most willing to respond to calling. This phase may last for a week or more.

Phase 6: Nesting Phase Gobbling Lull

Gobbling activity usually decreases within a few weeks of the majority of the hens being bred. During this phase the hens begin to spend more time on their nests, and fewer hens show up at early morning feeding and strutting areas. The decrease in gobbling at this time may be a result of the toms being worn out and seeing fewer hens. Older hens may breed again at this time if their first nesting attempt was unsuccessful. Yearling hens may begin their first breeding during this phase.

Phase 7: Post Nesting Phase Gobbling Peak

During my studies in both 1999 and 2000 there was an increase in gobbling activity by single subdominant toms and groups of jakes in late May. Because researchers believe that gobbling by dominant males suppresses gobbling by subdominants, I suspect that the subdominants jakes and toms began gobbling at this time because the dominants were done gobbling. This gobbling peak may precede a late breeding phase of older hens attempting to re-nest, and yearling hens attempting to nest for the first time. This phase may not occur in all areas.

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Peak Turkey Gobbling Activity Chart

Some of us like to know when peak turkey gobbling activity occurs in the state we intend to hunt, so we know which dates to choose for hunt dates. There are two normal peaks in gobbling activity, one before peak breeding and one after peak breeding. The problem with predicting the dates of these two gobbling peaks is that unlike the rut of many antlered animals, which occurs at approximately the same time every year due to photoperiod, but may be changed by a major difference in weather conditions earlier that year; turkey breeding time-frames (as in many ground nesting birds) are dependent on photoperiod, and to a great extent on spring weather (meteorology/phenology) conditions. Normal turkey breeding dates may be pushed forward by early warm weather and emergence of forage, or be delayed by later than normal cool weather and lack of forage. Turkeys may also re-nest if their first nesting attempt doesn't produce young due to untimely cold or wet weather; this may result in another gobbling peak.

Several studies also show that gobbling activity may be reduced by hunting pressure, especially when it occurs during one of the two gobbling peaks. Hunting pressure may cause an overall decrease in gobbling activity, with the result that there may be no discernable gobbling peaks, or there may be only one gobbling peak, and it could be the Pre-breeding Gobbling, the Post Breeding Gobbling Peak, or it may not coincide with either of these normal peaks.

So, peak turkey gobbling and breeding dates may very widely from year to year (refer to my Combined Year Gobbling Activity graph at the top of this page). But, turkey researchers can make some generalized predictions on the Pre-breeding Gobbling Peak and the Post Breeding Gobbling peak dates in many states. If dates are given, but no source is listed, the dates were provided by the State. It appears that some states do not have accurate data on when peak gobbling occurs.

If you can't find the information you need on the chart, check the dates of the nearest location. Remember that gobbling peaks vary from year to year due to meteorological conditions, and food availability, and that the peaks may last for 1-3 weeks. To determine when the peaks are most likely to occur take the middle date of the dates given, and figure peak gobbling may occur as much as a week before and a week after.

 

If you have information to add to this chart please contact me. TRMichels@yahoo.com

STATE

Area / Subspecies

Pre-Breeding Gobbling Peak

Post -Breeding Gobbling Peak

Source & Date

Alabama

*

1 week April

4 week April

 1966, 1967

Arizona

Merriams, Gould's

1-2 week May

See note at bottom

Arkansas

*

1 week April

1 week May

See note at bottom

California

*

No data

*

Seen note at bottom

Colorado

Merriam's

*

*

*

Connecticut

Eastern Area

April 1-20

April 20-May 9

1988

*

Western Area

April 21- 27

May 14-25

See note at bottom

Delaware

*

*

*

*

Florida

Statewide

Eastern, Osceola

Early - mid March

mid - late April

See note at bottom

Georgia

click here for map

Statewide

Mar 23-Apr 1

Apr 22-May 5

From 2003 turkey hunter survey

*

Region I

Apr 1-8

May 5-15

*

*

Region II

Apr 8-12

May 4-15

Apr 15-26

Apr 29-May 5

*

Region III

Mar 23-29

Apr 22- May 12

*

*

Region IV

Mar 23-29

Apr 12-14

Apr 29-May 5

*

*

Region V

Apr 6-12

Apr 20- May 5

*

Illinois

*

Indiana

*

1 week April

*

See note at bottom

Iowa

 

*

end of March - end of April

Mid-May - beginning of June

See note at bottom

Kansas

*

*

*

Kentucky

*

4 week March -

1 week April

1-2 week May

Dates approximate

Louisiana

*

4 week of March

4 week of April

*

Michigan

Lower

*

*

*

Maine

*

2-3 week of Apr

 2-3 week of May

*

Maryland

*

2-3 week of April

See note at bottom

Massachusetts

*

*

*

See note on NH at bottom

Michigan

*

April 14-18

May 22-28

*

Minnesota

South

Apr 5-15

May 5-15

TR. Michels

Mississippi

Statewide

1 week April

3-4 week April

See note at bottom

Missouri

*

1-2 week April

4 week April

*

Montana

*

*

*

Nebraska

eastern/Merriam's hybrid & Merriam's

1-2 week of April

3-4 week April

*

New Hampshire

*

2-3 week of April

1-2 week of April

See note at bottom

New Jersey

2-3 week of April

2 week of May

*

New York

Statewide

1-2 week of Apr

1-2 week of May

*

New Mexico

Merriam's,Gould's

*

*

*

North Carolina

Statewide

1 week of April

3-4 week of April

 *

North Dakota

eastern, eastern/Merraim's hybrid

 *

Ohio

*

2-3 week April

1-2 week of May

*

Oklahoma

Eastern, Rio Grande

late March - early April

*

See note at bottom

Oregon

Rio Grande

4 week of March to 1 week of April

4 week of April to 1 week of May

 See note at borrom

Pennsylvania

3-4 week April

 See note at bottom

Rhode Island

*

 *

South Carolina

*

3 week March

3 week April - 2 week May

 *

South Dakota

 Merriam's, Rio Grand

2 week of April

2 week May

 *

Tennessee

1 week of April

3 week of April

 *

Texas

Eastern subspecies

Rio Grande, eastern,

Eastern/Rio hybrid

1-2 week of April

3 week of April

 See note at bottom

Rio Grande subspeices

Northern 2/3 of state

1 week of April

3 week April

See note at bottom

Rio Grande subspeices

Southern 1/3 of state

4 week of March

*

*

Utah

*

No Data

*

See note at bottom

Vermont

*

3 week April

2-3 week May

See note at bottom

Virginia

Statewide

4 week March

4 week April - 1 week May

 See note at bottom

Washington

Rio Grande

No data

*

 See not at bottom

West Virginia

*

April 22-May 1

 See note at bottom

Wisconsin

3-4 week of April

mid-May

 *

Wyoming

Merriam's

2-3 week of April

???

 See note at bottom

Copyright 2001-2004 Trinity Mountain Publishing

State Responses

Arkansas

In Arkansas, we do not conduct gobble counts nor have we conducted any research to determine peak gobbling periods. Our brood survey data during the summer indicates that the peak breeding occurs during the second week of April with peak incubation during the last week of April. From that we can assume that peak gobbling would occur during the first week of April with a lesser peak during the first week of May.Brad Carner, Turkey Program Coordinator

Arizona

Peak gobbling activity is weather dependent, and can vary annually by as much as three weeks. Gobbling may start late in February and early March, with a second peak of gobbling occurring in early May. Toms may continue to gobble into June.

California

We don't have any data to address your request, and there is debate regarding the two peaks in the scientific literature. Overall, our season tends to be robust over the years, but may vary significantly from year to year.

Connecticut

Due to climatoligical differences the incubation period in the northwestern Connecticut may occur at al later date than in eastern Connecticut.

Iowa

Typically, the peak pre-breeding gobbling in Iowa ranges from the end of March through the end of April, and the post-breeding peak gobbling occurs mid- May through the beginning of June. Turkeys gobble extensively during the begining of breeding season to attract hens. Once the gobblers are with hens (end April-mid May), they usually don't gobble as much. Once the hens go off to sit on nests, they start to gobble again more (end of May-beginning of June) to attract any hens not on nests. Todd E. Gosselink, Ph.D, Forest Wildlife Research Biologist

Florida

Dear Mr. Michels: In response to your inquiry regarding wild turkey peak gobbling periods for Florida, I would like to emphasis that these gobbling peaks vary annually based on weather patterns, winter food availability, and for other unknown causes. With respect to Florida, a certain amount of latitudinal variation is also observed, with gobbling peaks typically occurring earlier in south Florida than in north Florida. On average, the pre-breeding gobbling peak typically occurs between early- to mid-March, with the post-breeding gobbling peak typically occurring from mid- to late-April.

As you stated, these dates usually coincide with the early breeding period (i.e., pre-breeding) and the average date when most hens are incubating their nest (i.e., post-breeding). It should also be noted, that the sub-tropical climate of Florida, especially south Florida, can result in extended gobbling periods, and gobbling may begin as early as January or February, however, peaks in gobbling activity typically occur during the dates listed above.

Indiana

Generally, the first peak of wild turkey gobbling in Indiana occurs around the first week of April. As you indicated, this can vary to some degree due to prevailing climatic conditions with day length (photo-period response) as the primary influence factor. Additionally, there is probably some additional variation in some states related to the respective state's north to south or east to west axis. Steven E. Backs, Wild Turkey Project Leader, Indiana Division of Fish and Wildlife

The objective of setting the spring turkey season dates is to avoid the primary breeding period and intercept the second peak of gobbling brought on by the onset of most hens beginning incubation because they have already successfully bred. The onset of breeding in wild turkeys is primarily controlled by day length (photo-period) and is generally about the same time each year and generally does not vary significantly across the state. During any given spring, the peak of breeding can vary 7 to 10 days for various reasons including such factors as the physical condition of hens following winter, spring green chronology, and prevailing climatic conditions. Several years ago, the season was extended to 19 days to better "capture" the second peak and extend hunter opportunity.

Maine

Unfortunately, we do not have data regarding peak gobbling periods by turkeys in Maine. My impression is that gobbling peaks during the 2nd two weeks of April and again during the 2nd two weeks of May, however hunting pressure seems to stifle gobbling activity, and again we have no data to support my impression on the timing of gobbling. If you get these data from NH, VT, or NY I would consider those dates applicable to Maine as well. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. Andy Weik Wildlife Biologist

Maryland

The one-day Junior Turkey Hunt occurs when gobbling activity is at its peak (held sometime between the 2nd and 3rd week of April).

Mississippi

Although there is no such thing as a perfectly "normal spring hunting season," based on the data from tens of thousands of turkey hunts during the last five years, we could consider normal gobbling patterns in Mississippi during this time to have 3 general phases - rise, stabilization, and fall in gobbling frequency. You can see on the figure titled "Average Weekly Gobbling by Regions, 1996 - 2000" that gobbling activity in each area of the state, except Turkey Region 5 (southeast MS), generally follows this pattern. A peak of calling generally occurs in mid-June across most
of Mississippi.

The "Rising Phase" of the season occurs from the first to second week when we see an average increase of about 15% in gobbling activity. During the "Stable Phase," from week 2 through week 4, we typically experience a leveling off or a peak in activity. The "Falling Phase" occurs during the last part of the season when gobbling activity declines from week 4 to week 6 for all regions except Turkey Region 5. Averaging all regions, except Turkey Region 5, shows an almost 22% drop in gobbling activity during this period.

Gobbling Activity v. Weeks of the MS Hunting season

 

Turkey Region 5 appears to be somewhat unique from the rest of the state. Although it experiences a rise from the first to second week, the increase is not as great as the more northern regions. From weeks 2 - 4, gobbling activity in Turkey Region 5 declines sharply before leveling off in week 5 and actually increasing during week 6. The increase during week 6 is being strongly influenced by sharp increases during the last two hunting seasons. If we examine individual weeks by year, all regions show an increase in gobbling activity during week six in 1999 and 2000. This may be due to the increased age structure of gobblers which has resulted from increasing populations and the "no jake" regulation.

When is peak gobbling in different regions?

Regional averages of gobbling activity by week from 1996 - 2000 indicate the timing of peak gobbling varies throughout the state and appears to occur earlier the further south you hunt. Hunters in Turkey Regions 4 (southwest MS) and 5 of south Mississippi hear much more gobbling during the early season with peak activity occurring during the second week. Although gobbling data only are recorded during the season, each year we hear stories of turkeys gobbling like crazy before the season opens in the southern part of the state. These pre-season reports indicate Regions 4 and 5 may actually already be in the "Stable Phase" by the time the opening day rolls around.

Gobbling activity in Turkey Region 3 (east-central Mississippi), increases sharply during the 2nd week and actually peaks in week 3 before declining significantly during week 4. In Region 2 (the delta counties), gobbling activity also peaks during week 3 but remains fairly stable from weeks 2 - 4 and does not experience much decline until week 5. Gobbling activity in Turkey Region 1 (northeast MS) increases throughout the season but does not peak until week 4, the second week in April.

Nebraska

Though we've collected no information on gobbling activity in Nebraska, I would say the pre-breeding peak would probably occur in mid-April and the post-breeding peak would occur in early to mid-May.

New Hampshire

The sequence of breeding and nesting is pretty similar between New Hampshire, Vermont and the southern half of Maine. I suspect that nesting will begin somewhat later in Coos County, and in the northern parts of Grafton and Carroll Counties. The sequence of events is somewhat earlier to the south of us in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Some gobbling usually starts during the second half of February, particularly if there are numerous sunny days, and minimal snow cover or (there is) bare ground spots. The first peak of gobbling is during in the southern half of the state is approximately during the middle of April, but can be during early April or even late April... The second peak of gobbling is during the "principal" incubation period, which is May 4-8. There is often considerable response to hunter calling, and turkey gobbling in late May and early June, when gobblers have a difficult time finding any remaining hens in circulation.

New Jersey

I had to go back and conduct some research on gobbling peaks in New Jersey as data has not been collected on this subject in about twenty-three years. It appears that the two NJ peaks fall around the second or third week of April and again during the second week of May. Tony McBride, Principal Biologist, NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife

Oklahoma

T.R. We do not conduct gobbling surveys in Oklahoma. Our spring turkey season opens on April 6th and runs through May 6th each year. Peak incubation usually occurs during mid to late April. The peak hatch usually occurs during mid to late May. The mature hens will usually establish their nests and begin to lay in late March to early April with the juvenile hens establishing their nests usually two to three weeks later.

To give you a timeframe of peak gobbling activity; usually late March to early April. We may hear some gobbling activity as late as July. If the weather warms in February, we will hear some gobbling at this time.

We have observed turkeys hatching broods as early as mid March and as late as early September. Oklahoma has extreme variables in weather conditions from the western part of the state through the eastern part of the state. Heavy rains can occur during April and May which will usually result in high occurances of nest mortality.

You asked for peak pre-breeding and post-breeding gobbling acitivities; I would have to infer that mid March to early April would be the peak pre-breeding gobbling acitvity and late April to mid May would be the peak post-breeding gobbling activity. Jack Waymire Eastern Wild Turkey Project Leader

Oregon

T. R. - That is a difficult question for Oregon since the Eastern part of the state is so different that the Western portion. The Eastern portion of Oregon has a much later Spring than the Westside. They can often be 2-4 weeks behind Western Oregon and still have snow on the ground when Western Oregon has greened up and turkeys are nesting. But I will give you my best shot at this.

My experience is the peak gobbling period (pre-nesting) is the last week of March, and first week of April and the second peak of the gobbling activity (post-nesting) is the last week of April-first week of May. Hope this helps. David Budeau

Pennsylvania

T.R. Pennsylvania sets the youth spring gobbler hunt for April 24, 2003,which is a week earlier than the start of the statewide spring gobbler season, which is when young hunters will be afield at a time when the turkey population is at its highest level, before the birds are hunted by others and at the peak of gobbling activity.

South Dakota

The entire length of the SD turkey season encompasses the breeding season for wild turkeys in the Black Hills. This year, as in many past years, the birds were demonstrating breeding behavior as early as January but the primary breeding season generally occurs beginning in early April and will progress through at least the first part of May. From past studies by Mark Rumble and others, there does appear to be a small spike in breeding activity that seems to consistently occur during the second week in April but it is heavily influenced by climatic conditions and progress of movement toward summer ranges. Bottom line is that breeding behavior begins in earnest, in spite of the weather, in early March and will continue as late as the first part of June in some years. Hope this helps. John Wrede, Regional Wildlife Manager

Tennessee

(Gobbling) Activity continues with peaks and valleys for about 6-7 weeks. For the pre-breeding gobbling peak it will be around the 1st of April and the post-breeding gobbling peak will be around the 21st of April. Of course it can shift within a week. It also varies by geographic regions and usually begins in west Tennessee and moves east. If you have any more questions, please feel free to contact me.

Texas

T.R. You are correct in that these dates hop around a lot from year to year but I will try and answer as best I can.

Eastern subspecies

I'll do easterns first because they are the easiest. Peak gobbling activity is a function of both photoperiod and physical condition of both hens and gobblers. Although day length does not vary much from year to year physical condition is a function of diet which in turn is a function of habitat and environmental influences that impact habitat like temperature and precipitation.

In East Texas, since we usually have wet winters and springs and the temperatures usually warm up early there is not much variance for our easterns. Peak gobbling occurs during the second and first halves of the first 2 weeks of April, respectively, for easterns in Texas. The second peak of gobbling occurs when the majority of hens initiate incubation. This occurs during the third week of April.

Rio Grande subspecies

Rio gobbling activity is extremely variable and dependent entirely upon range conditions, therefore, it is entirely unpredictable not only from year to year but within years and between regions.

However, you can offer to your readers a template that may help them decipher when is best for them on their own. If range conditions are lush (a product of good winter and spring rains) then peak gobbling will be the first week of the season (For the south zone (roughly the bottom third of Texas) the first season is the last Saturday in March. In the north zone it starts the first Saturday of April, and the second peak will be similar to easterns (the third week of April). If range conditions are droughty and remain droughty throughout the season then peak gobbling occurred in March prior to the opener and your best bet is still the first week because there will be no second peak.

If conditions are droughty at the start but timely rains improve range conditions during the season then gobbling activity will be best the last week of the season.

Utah

Unfortunately, we've not yet collected data or studied peak gobbling times on our birds in Utah.

Dean L. Mitchell Upland Game Program Coordinator, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

Vermont

We don't have "pre-breeding" and "post-breeding" gobbling of any consequence in Vermont. Turkey gobbling activity is directly associated with breeding/courtship of hens in the spring. Our peak gobbling is somewhat weather dependent and occurs around the third week in April (give or take a week, week and a half ). We often have a smaller "peak" around mid-May, with similar variation.

Doug Blodgett, Vermont Fish and Wildlife Dept.

Virginia

Gobbling rates differed among regions. In all regions, during the hunting season, gobbling rates tended to decline in 2-week intervals. Statewide, we noticed a generalized pattern through the season where gobbling through the first 10-14 days of hunting, then increased for 6-8 days, and declined thereafter. The only exception to this pattern occurred in 1993, when peak gobbling activity increased to a peak around May 6 in all regions.

Washington

At this time, we do not have specific information that could be used to answer your questions about turkey gobbling peaks in Washington. In general, we time our hunting season (April 15-May 15) to take place between the peak of breeding and the peak of hatching. According to literature, this should include the second peak of gobbling, however, we have not commissioned a study of the timing of gobbling in Washington. Currently, the National Wild Turkey Federation is surveying the different state agencies to gather peak of gobbling activity information. They may be of help. Good luck. Mick Cope, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

West Virginia

I do not have available at this time data on the peak of gobbling pre-breeding. We collect data from our hunters that scout prior to our hunting season, but I am not satisfied with the sample size to prove that we have two peaks in gobbling. Our Spring Gobbler Survey Data indicates our peak in gobbling is between April 22-May 1. I would be interested in receiving knowledge about your book when completed. James C. Pack. Sr. Wildlife Biologist III

Wisconsin 

In Wisconsin the primary peak may be somewhere in the vicinity of the third or fourth week in April and the secondary peak in mid-May. Typically there will be some variance with this throughout the southern vs. northern parts of the state. There are also many variables esp. weather which will play a large factor in gobbling activity. Andrea Mezera

Wyoming

In Wyoming the pre breeding gobbling peak is usually the second and third weeks of April. This may vary a little from year to year depending on the weather. As for the second gobbling period, research in the state of Mississipi indicates there is no such thing as a second post breeding gobbling peak. (I'm not buying that one. T.R.) Turkeys may respond to a call better later on when hens are nesting but they often come in quietly with very little gobbling taking place. Al Langston

 

There is more information on turkey activity in the Turkey Addict's Manual available in the Trinity Mountain Outdoor Products catalog.

 

Questions? Log on to the "T.R.'s Tips" Talk Forum / Message Board

 

The data, graphs and information on this page are the sole copyrighted property of T.R. Michels/Trinity Mountain Publishing. Copying and use of the data, graphs or information, without the written permission of the owner, is expressly forbidden by Federal law.

 

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T.R. Michels, Trinity Mountain Outdoors, PO Box 284, Wanamingo, MN 55983

Phone: 507-824-3296 E-mail: trmichels@yahoo.com Website: www.TRMichels.com

 

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